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PART

OVERVIEW

THE MUTATING VIRUS:
UNDERSTANDING
ANTISEMITISM

ANTISEMITISM
AND
PERSECUTION

IS ANTISEMITISM NOW WORLDWIDE?

How Many Are
Antisemitic?

10 Most
Antisemitic Countries
10  Least

Antisemitic Countries
--------------

Tel Aviv University    Worldwide
Anti- Semitism

HOW HAS
ANTISEMITISM AFFECTED
THE JEWS?

THE EVOLUTION
OF
ANTISEMITISM

ANTISEMIISM
AND THE

LEFT

ANTISEMIISM
AND THE
UNITED NATIONS

CHRISTIANITY
 AND
 ANTISEMITISM

ANTISEMITISM IN THE ARAB WORLD

ZIONISM

CHANGING THE NAME OF
ANTISEMITISM

NAZIS


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THE

INCREDIBLE

STORY OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE








 WHAT IS ANTISEMITISM?

__________________________________


EVOLUTION OF ANTISEMITISM

The reason for antagonism to the Jews has changed over time.   Dr Henry Abrahamson in his video on Medieval Antisemitism defines four periods

  1. Roman Greek
  2. Early Christian Anti-Semitism
  3. Medieval Antisemitism
  4. Modern Antisemitism

Go to UNDERSTANDING THE DARK AND MIDDLE AGES  

WHAT DO WE NOW MEAN BY ANTISEMITISM ?
From antisemitism.uk

In 2005, the EU Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia (EUMC), now the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), adopted a “working definition on antisemitism” which has become the standard definition used around the world, including by the European Parliament, the UK College of Policing, the US Department of State, and the 31 countries comprising the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. In 2016, the powerful House of Commons Home Affairs Select Committee joined Campaign Against Antisemitism’s longstanding call for the British Government and its agencies, as well as all political parties, to formally adopt the international definition of antisemitism.

The Government is to formally adopt an internationally-recognised definition of anti-Semitism that highlights modern expressions of hate, Theresa May has announced.

(The prime minister revealed that Britain will become one of the first countries to individually adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition when she addresses 800 guests at Conservative Friends of Israel’s annual lunch in central London.

May told guests, including several members of the cabinet and hundreds of parliamentarians, that her aim for Britain is to be the same as Israel in guaranteeing the rights of people of all religions, races and sexualities – enabling all to flourish. Jewish News )

DEFINITION OF ANTISEMITISM

Antisemitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of antisemitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.

In addition, such manifestations could also target the state of Israel, conceived as a Jewish collectivity. Antisemitism frequently charges Jews with conspiring to harm humanity, and it is often used to blame Jews for “why things go wrong.” It is expressed in speech, writing, visual forms and action, and employs sinister stereotypes and negative character traits.

Contemporary examples of antisemitism in public life, the media, schools, the workplace, and in the religious sphere could, taking into account the overall context, include, but are not limited to:

Examples of the ways in which antisemitism manifests itself with regard to the State of Israel taking into account the overall context could include:

However, criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic.

WILHELM MARR
from CFCA (The Coordination Forum for Counteracting Antisemitism)

Wilhelm Marr (1819-1904) was a German agitator and theorist, who coined the term "antisemitism" as a euphemism for the German Judenhass, or "Jew-hate".

Marr was an unemployed journalist, who claimed that he had lost his job due to Jewish interference. A political conservative, he was influenced by the conservative pan-German movement, as expounded by Johann Gottfried von Herder, who developed the idea of the Volk, and the Burschenschaft movement of the early nineteenth century, which developed out of frustration among German students with the failure of the Congress of Vienna to create a unified state out of all the territories inhabited by the Volk. The latter rejected the participation of Jewish and other non-German minorities as members, "unless they prove that they are anxious to develop within themselves a Christian-German spirit" (a decision of the "Burschenschaft Congress of 1818"). While they were opposed to the participation of Jews in their movement, like Heinrich von Treitschke later, they did allow for the possibility of the Jewish (and other) minorities participating in the German state if they were to abandon all signs of ethnic and religious distinctiveness and assimilate completely into German Volk.

Marr took these philosophies one step further by rejecting the premise of assimilation as a means for Jews to become Germans. In his pamphlet Der Weg zum Siege des Germanentums über das Judentum (The Way to Victory of Germanicism over Judaism, 1879) he introduced the idea that Germans and Jews were locked in a longstanding conflict, the origins of which he attributed to race — and that the Jews were winning. He argued that Jewish emancipation resulting from German liberalism had allowed the Jews to control German finance and industry. Furthermore, since this conflict was based on the different qualities of the Jewish and German races, it could not be resolved even by the total assimilation of the Jewish population. According to him, the struggle between Jews and Germans would only be resolved by the victory of one and the ultimate death of the other. A Jewish victory, he concluded, would result in finis Germaniae (the end of the German people). To prevent this from happening, in 1879 Marr founded the League of Antisemites (Antisemiten-Liga), the first German organization committed specifically to combatting the alleged threat to Germany posed by the Jews and advocating their forced removal from the country.

Although he had introduced the pseudo-scientific racial component into the debate over Jews in Germany, it is unlikely that he was influenced by the earlier theories of Arthur de Gobineau (author of An Essay on the Inequality of Human Races, 1853), who was only translated into German in 1898, a quarter of a century after Marr's pamphlet appeared. Furthermore, Marr himself was very vague about what constituted race and, in turn, the racial differences between Jews and Germans, though this became a feature of Nazi racial science. It remained for later racial thinkers to postulate specific differences: these included Eugen Dühring, who suggested that it was blood, and Houston Stewart Chamberlain, an influential race theorist and husband of Eva Wagner, Richard Wagner's daughter, who suggested phrenology as a means of distinguishing races.

On the other hand, it does seem likely that Marr was influenced by Ernst Haeckel, a professor who popularized the notion of Social Darwinism among Germany's educated classes.

Despite his influence, Marr's ideas were not immediately adopted by German nationalists. The Pan-German League, founded in 1891, originally allowed for the membership of Jews, provided they were fully assimilated into German culture. It was only in 1912, eight years after Marr's death, that the League declared racism as an underlying principle. Nevertheless, Marr was a major link in the evolving chain of German racism that erupted into genocide during the Nazi era.

LATE RENUNCIATION OF ANTISEMITISM
From Wikipedia

Toward the end of his life Marr came to renounce anti-semitism, arguing that social upheaval in Germany had been the result of the Industrial Revolution and conflict between political movements. According to Moshe Zimmermann he "openly requested the Jews' pardon for having erred in isolating the problem".[2] He published in Hamburg a final essay entitled Testament of an Antisemite in which he explained the history of his thinking, asserting that he had originally been a "philo-Semite", having rejected "the miserable Romantic madness of Germanism". He complained that modern anti-Semitism was becoming merged with German mysticism and nationalism. Marr condemned 'the beer drinking leaders, the gay "Heil" shouters of modern anti-Semitism' and crude prejudice against Jewish writers and thinkers.

From Wikipedia

Antisemitism (also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is hostility, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews.  A person who holds such positions is called an antisemite. Antisemitism is widely considered to be a form of racism.

The root word Semite gives the false impression that antisemitism is directed against all Semitic people. However, the compound word antisemite was popularized in Germany in 1879 as a scientific-sounding term for Judenhass "Jew-hatred" and that has been its common use since then.

Antisemitism may be manifested in many ways, ranging from expressions of hatred of or discrimination against individual Jews to organized pogroms by mobs, state police, or even military attacks on entire Jewish communities. Although the term did not come into common usage until the 19th century, it is now also applied to historic anti-Jewish incidents. Notable instances of persecution include the Rhineland massacres preceding the First Crusade in 1096, the Edict of Expulsion from England in 1290, the massacres of Spanish Jews in 1391, the persecutions of the Spanish Inquisition, the expulsion from Spain in 1492, the Cossack massacres in Ukraine from 1648 to 1657, various anti-Jewish pogroms in the Russian Empire between 1821 and 1906, the 1894–1906 Dreyfus affair in France, the Holocaust in German-occupied Europe, official Soviet anti-Jewish policies, and Arab and Muslim involvement in the Jewish exodus from Arab and Muslim countries.


EXAMPLES OF HOW JEWS HAVE BEEN PERSECUTED ARE

Expulsion  *  Forced Conversion  *  Being Burned Alive  *  Stake Burnings  


 *  Holocaust  *  Pogrom  *  Book Confiscation  *  Taxation


Book Burning  *  Enslavement *  Having to Wear Identity Badges

        

Property/Asset Confiscation  *  Being Outlawed  *  Mob Attacks  *   Public Torture

        

Synagogue Confiscation/Burning  *  Land Confiscation *  Mass Arrests   *   Boycotts  


IN THE 19th and 20th CENTURY THIS HAPPENED IN  

(From Simple to Remember List from 250 BCE to 1945 CE)


1801  Bucharest - Mob Attack

1804  Russian Villages - Expulsion

1808  Russian Countryside - Expulsion

1815  Lubeck & Bremen - Expulsion

1820  Bremes - Expulsion

1843  Austria & Prussia - Expulsion

1850  New York City where 500 People, Led by Police, Attacked & Wrecked Jewish Synagogue

1862  Area under General Grant's Jurisdiction in the United States - Expulsion

1866 C.E Galatz (Romania) - Expulsion

1871  Odena Mob - Attack

1887  Slovakia Mob - Attack

1897  Kantakuzenka (Russia) - Mob Attack

1898  Rennes (France) - Mob Attack

1899  Nicholayev - Mob Attack


1900  Konitz (Prussia) Mob Attack

1902  Poland Widespread Pogroms

1904  Manchuria, Kiev & Volhynia Widespread Pogroms

1905  Zhitomir (Yolhynia) Mob Attacks

1919 Bavaria Expulsion

1915  Georgia (U.S.A.) Leo Frank Lynched

1919  Prague Wide Spread Pogroms

1920  Munich & Breslau Mob Attacks

1922  Boston, MA Lawrence Lowell, President of Harvard,
calls for Quota Restrictions on Jewish Admission

1926  Uzbekistan Pogrom

1928  Hungary Widespread antisemitic Riots on University Campuses

1929 Lemberg (Poland) Mob Attacks

1930  Berlin Mob Attack

1933 Bucharest Mob Attacks

1938-45  Europe Holocaust


The Persistent Survival of Anti-Semitism,  MiDA, Robert Wistrich |  27/04/2014

Anti-semitism didn't die in Auschwitz; it just changed forms.

LINKS

Antisemitism Summary overview of the situation in the European Union 2001-2009    Summary overview of the situation in the European Union 2001-2009   University of Minnesota, Human Rights Library

A Brief History of Antisemism    Anti Defamation League

Community Security Trust (CST)   UK

The Deep Roots of Anti-Semitism in European Society  Jewish Political Studies Review 17:1-2 (Spring 2005)

The Theological Roots of Antisemitism - Simon Wiesenthal Center …

Antisemitism: A Historical Survey - Simon Wiesenthal Center ...

Anti-Semitism in the 21st Century  Taboo no longer?  My Jewish Learning by Ira Rifkin

ANTISEMITISM
IT DIDN’T JUST START WITH HITLER