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 HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY IS A MEMORIAL DAY THROUGHOUT THE WORLD

EACH COUNTRY HAS ITS OWN ORGANISATION

THIS PAGE REFERS TO THE UK

FOR INFORMATION GO TO

HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY TRUST

________________________________

 
HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY  
SUNDAY 29 JANUARY 2017
_________________________________


Interfaith Holocaust Memorial Days
are held
throughout the world

This was held by the

London Borough of Barnet
at Middlesex University on
Sunday 29 January 2017

and is from their
Memorial Programme



INTRODUCTION

On Holocaust Memorial Day here in Barnet we commemorate the millions killed by acts of persecution and genocide. We pay tribute to the survivors of such atrocities, many of whom are resident in the London Borough of Barnet.

Holocaust Memorial Day is a time when we seek to learn the lessons of the past and to recognise that genocide does not just take place on its own, it’s a steady process which can begin if discrimination, racism and hatred are not checked and prevented.

The theme this year is ‘How can life go on?’

Each year, the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust chooses a different theme to enable discussion and create fresh, stimulating and engaging activities.

The aim is to educate so that such despicable events never happen again and to encourage us all to embrace living together in harmony in our diverse community.

This year’s theme poses an incredibly complex and wide ranging question: It involves trauma and coming to terms with the past; displacement and refugees; justice; rebuilding communities; reconciliation and forgiveness; remembering; facing hate - denial and trivialisation; facing hate - today; and finally - how to start living again.

Thank you for attending today.

Councillor David Longstaff

The Worshipful the Mayor of the London Borough of Barnet











WHAT IS THE HOLOCAUST?

When Adolf Hitler rose to power in Germany in 1933, no one could have known the death and destruction that would follow. In just 12 years, he contributed to the deaths of over 50 million people and caused untold suffering to millions more.

Hitler targeted many sectors of the community for persecution, including Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, Poles and those with physical and mental disabilities. Thousands of people - such as those of African descent - were sterilised. Many were the victims of the Nazi ‘euthanasia’ programme and millions more were sent to camps where they were immediately exterminated or worked to death.

This is what we call ‘The Holocaust’.

HOW CAN LIFE GO ON?

How can life go on after a genocide? The aftermath of the Holocaust and of subsequent genocides continue to raise challenging questions for individuals, communities and nations.

How do people react in the immediate aftermath of unimaginable suffering? How can life be rebuilt after such trauma? Is justice after genocide possible? What role do we in the UK have towards individuals, communities and nations who have survived genocide?

Holocaust Memorial Day is not only about commemorating past genocides and honouring those who died, but about standing with those who survive.

By phrasing the theme as a question, Holocaust Memorial Day 2017 asks audiences to think about what happens after genocide and of our own responsibilities in the wake of such a crime.

This year’s theme is broad and open ended, and there are few known answers.

MULTI-FAITH MESSAGES

We gather together today, solemnly and soberly to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.  It is a deeply poignant moment when we pause to remember and contemplate one of the most wicked and dehumanizing moments from the past. As time moves on, fewer and fewer survivors are left who directly remember these terrible days. This makes the imperative for us to remember ever more important - as individuals and as communities. Firstly, so that the unimaginably horrendous suffering of the victims of the Holocaust is never forgotten. Secondly, to show those who survived and the families of those who didn’t, that their ordeal is not unknown, nor un-mourned, and that the Holocausts devastating implications for our society and indeed all humanity have not been forgotten. Thirdly, we remember in the hope that learning from a moment when humanity got it so darkly wrong, we might challenge indifference and injustice in the future, hoping that humanity can learn from the past.

And as we contemplate this cruelest of times, we can also find some encouragement,!for in this darkness there shone light, in those men and women who amid their greatest ordeal, showed courage and kindness. We remember the generosity and sacrifice of those who within and without the persecution stood up and risked | themselves challenging hate and tyranny.

As we hope that the world moves to better times, positivity might be dampened by seemingly endless and depressing news from around the world. But hope must I not be deterred, for it is in moments such as this commemoration that we not only remember both the darkness of past evils and the light of those whose courage shone, but also take encouragement that peoples of so many races, creeds and cultures come together to remember - there is hope and light in our shared grief and in our desire to not only remember together, but to live, work and move forward together. So, as we share in the deep horror and pain that Holocaust Memorial Day brings to our minds and souls, let us also be grateful for this unity in diversity and let us take up this day’s challenge to remember and to move forward in unity and friendship.

Father Tristan Chapman (Mayor’s Chaplain)


British Muslims share the pain and anguish of the Holocaust. None of us must forget how it began with hatred dehumanising an entire, innocent people because of their religion and ethnicity. We must reflect and vow to speak out against any ethnic and religion based injustices whenever they occur.

Shakil Ahmed, Principal, Ayesha Community School


Once again we have gathered to commemorate the deaths of many millions, the six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust and the many others who have perished in subsequent genocides the world over. Recalling is more than looking at the past and acknowledging its horrors. The glance behind must act as a jolt to the present and especially the future. It must stir within us a hope, however faint, that maybe humanity will learn to live peacefully alongside each other. Many that went to their brutal deaths had some hope of salvation right up to their final moments on earth. That hope must be our legacy and be the driving force within us. Hope must drive us all to work where everyone can sit under their vine and fig tree without fear.

The evils of the past must engender in us an active will, that we, each in our way, can make this world of ours that little better.

Reverend Bernd Koschland


Holocaust Memorial Day 2017 Programme Message from the Barnet Multi Faith Forum.

Since Auschwitz we know what man is capable of; And Since Hiroshima we know what is at stake. (Victor Frankl)

As we enter this uncertain new year of 2017 and assemble to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day, our collective memories will allow us to have Reflections on Loss and Living, the theme of this year’s Holocaust Memorial Day.

My wife and I recently took an opportunity to revisit the death camps of Auschwitz and Birkenau and to reflect on the rich diversity of Jewish life that existed in Poland before the coming of the Nazis. The populism that emerged in those times and it’s reappearance now, as exhibited in the Brexit vote and the Trump election, and which is surfacing across the world, should give all people of goodwill cause for concern. When we add the fear of the foreigner to an anti establishment attack on those pillars that maintain our democratic values and economic security, we have serious cause to reflect on past catastrophes.

“The hate that begins with Jews, never ends with Jews, wherever you find anti- Semitism, there you also find a threat to liberty.” (Lord Johnathan Sacks)

The myths, stereotypes and prejudice perpetrated by the Nazis against all who were different, remain at the heart of populist regimes and have characterised those genocides committed in Cambodia, Ruanda, Bosnia (Srebrenica), Darfur, Armenia and now in Syria. We are once again living through uncertain, insecure and challenging times and as reflected in our own popular press there are echoes of this rhetoric, which cause some people to fear and turn against others. It is therefore our responsibility to ensure that we repeat the facts of how the Nazis initially used anti- Semitism to poison their citizens against the Jews and ended up by murdering ten million of their own people. Fortunately many of our young people have now visited the death camps, or have spoken to survivors and are learning from their experiences, to show us by example, of why fascism, racism and terrorism must never again achieve legitimacy in a civilised world.

This is the reason that people across Europe connect together on Holocaust Memorial Day. It’s a time to reflect on its cause and its effect and a time to renew our efforts to work in peace and understanding to preserve the values of freedom of expression and liberty of thought, that we hold so precious, for the living.

Barnet Multi Faith Forum will do all it can to promote social cohesion and inclusion for all people in our Borough and rededicate ourselves to constantly oppose intolerance, injustice, bigotry and hatred, wherever and whenever it occurs.

Esmond Rosen, Chair of the Barnet Multi Faith Forum January 2017


A Baha’i prayer for mankind

“0 Thou kind Lord! Thou hast created all humanity from the same stock. Thou hast decreed that all shall belong to the same household. In Thy Holy Presence they are all Thy servants, and all mankind are sheltered beneath Thy Tabernacle; all have gathered together at Thy Table of Bounty; all are illumined through the light of Thy Providence.”

“0 God! Thou art kind to all, Thou hast provided for all, dost shelter all, conferrest life upon all. Thou hast endowed each and all with talents and faculties, and all are submerged in the Ocean of Thy Mercy.

0 Thou kind Lord! Unite all. Let the religions agree and make the nations one, so that they may see each other as one family and the whole earth as one home. May they all live together in perfect harmony.

0 God! Raise aloft the banner of the oneness of mankind.

0 God! Establish the Most Great Peace.

Cement Thou, 0 God, the hearts together.

0 Thou kind Father, God! Gladden our hearts through the fragrance of Thy love. Brighten our eyes through the Light of Thy Guidance. Delight our ears with the melody of Thy Word, and shelter us all in the Stronghold of Thy Providence.

Thou art the Mighty and Powerful, Thou art the Forgiving and Thou art the One Who overlooketh the shortcomings of all mankind.”


Abdu’l-Bahd


LINKS

Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

Holocaust Memorial Day
2017

Holocaust Memorial Day
2016