ISRAEL




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HOW DOES
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OUR FUTURE WITH
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(President Rivlin)


TOGETHER

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2020


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Why is Israel the
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in the Midlle East?

Palestinians
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Arab - Israel
Basis of Conflict
Part 1/2

Palestinians
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Part 2/2

The
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PALESTINIANS
TIMELINE


Palestine Refugee
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Palestine
People and the
Country Name


How Many
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Does Anybody Care About the Palestinians?

Arab
Discrimination
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Lives of
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Palestinian Refugees
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_______

Refugee Camps

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Payments to Jailed Palestinians and ‘Martyrs’ by the Palestinian AuthorityP


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4,000 YEARS
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1948-2012

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4000 YEARS
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Why has Christendom
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Islam

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Freedom in the World MAP 2019


FREEDOM IN THE MIDDLE EAST 2019
Methodology 2019


Freedom in the World is an annual global report on political rights and civil liberties, composed of numerical ratings and descriptive texts for each country and a select group of territories. The 2019 edition covers developments in 195 countries and 14 territories from January 1, 2018, through December 31, 2018.


The report’s methodology is derived in large measure from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1948. Freedom in the World is based on the premise that these standards apply to all countries and territories, irrespective of geographical location, ethnic or religious composition, or level of economic development. Freedom in the World operates from the assumption that freedom for all people is best achieved in liberal democratic societies.


Freedom in the World assesses the real-world rights and freedoms enjoyed by individuals, rather than governments or government performance per se. Political rights and civil liberties can be affected by both state and nonstate actors, including insurgents and other armed groups.


Freedom House does not believe that legal guarantees of rights are sufficient for on-the-ground fulfillment of those rights. While both laws and actual practices are factored into scoring decisions, greater emphasis is placed on implementation.


Territories are selected for assessment in Freedom in the World based on the following criteria: whether the area is governed separately from the rest of the relevant country or countries, either de jure or de facto; whether conditions on the ground for political rights and civil liberties are significantly different from those in the rest of the relevant country or countries, meaning a separate assessment is likely to yield different ratings; whether the territory is the subject of enduring popular or diplomatic pressure for autonomy, independence, or incorporation into another country; whether the territory’s boundaries are sufficiently stable to allow an assessment of conditions for the year under review, and whether they can be expected to remain stable in future years so that year-on-year comparisons are possible; and whether the territory is large and/or politically significant. Freedom House typically takes no position on territorial or separatist disputes as such, focusing instead on the level of political rights and civil liberties in a given geographical area.


Scoring Process

Freedom in the World uses a three-tiered system consisting of scores, ratings, and status. The complete list of the questions used in the scoring process, and the tables for converting scores to ratings and ratings to status, appear at the end of this essay.


Scores – A country or territory is awarded 0 to 4 points for each of 10 political rights indicators and 15 civil liberties indicators, which take the form of questions;

a score of 0 represents the smallest degree of freedom and 4 the greatest degree of freedom.

The political rights questions are grouped into three subcategories: Electoral Process (3 questions), Political Pluralism and Participation (4), and Functioning of Government (3).

The civil liberties questions are grouped into four subcategories: Freedom of Expression and Belief (4 questions), Associational and Organizational Rights (3), Rule of Law (4), and Personal Autonomy and Individual Rights (4). The political rights section also contains an additional discretionary question. For the discretionary question, a score of 1 to 4 may be subtracted, as applicable (the worse the situation, the more points may be subtracted).

The highest overall score that can be awarded for political rights is 40 (or a score of 4 for each of the 10 questions).

The highest overall score that can be awarded for civil liberties is 60 (or a score of 4 for each of the 15 questions).

The scores from the previous edition are used as a benchmark for the current year under review. A score is typically changed only if there has been a real-world development during the year that warrants a decline or improvement (e.g., a crackdown on the media, the country’s first free and fair elections), though gradual changes in conditions—in the absence of a signal event—are occasionally registered in the scores.


Political Rights and Civil Liberties Ratings – A country or territory is assigned two ratings—one for political rights and one for civil liberties—based on its total scores for the political rights and civil liberties questions.

Each rating of 1 to 7, with 1 representing the greatest degree of freedom and 7 the smallest degree of freedom, corresponds to a specific range of total scores (see tables 1 and 2).


Free, Partly Free, Not Free Status – The average of a country or territory’s political rights and civil liberties ratings i

s called the Freedom Rating, and it is this figure that determines the status of Free (1.0 to 2.5), Partly Free (3.0 to 5.0), or Not Free (5.5 to 7.0)
(see table 3).


Trend Arrows – A country or territory may be assigned an upward or downward trend arrow to highlight developments of major significance or concern. These developments may include a positive or negative shift over multiple years, an especially notable change in a single year, or an important event in a country that is particularly influential in its region or the world. A trend arrow must be linked to a specific change or changes in score, and cannot be assigned if the country had no net change in score. Most score changes do not warrant trend arrows. Decisions on whether a country or territory should receive a trend arrow are made by Freedom House staff, after consultation with the analyst and expert advisers.


Electoral Democracy – Freedom in the World assigns the designation “electoral democracy” to countries that have met certain minimum standards for political rights and civil liberties; territories are not included in the list of electoral democracies. According to the methodology,

an electoral democracy designation requires a score of 7 or better in the Electoral Process subcategory, an overall political rights score of 20 or better, and an overall civil liberties score of 30 or better. (The civil liberties threshold was added as part of the 2016–17 methodology review.)

Freedom House’s “electoral democracy” designation should not be equated with “liberal democracy,” a term that implies a more robust observance of democratic ideals and a wider array of civil liberties. In Freedom in the World, most Free countries could be considered liberal democracies, while some Partly Free countries might qualify as electoral, but not liberal, democracies.







THE

INCREDIBLE

STORY OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE


HOW DOES ‘FREEDOM IN ISRAEL’
COMPARE  TO ‘FREEDOM’ IN ARAB COUNTRIES?

COUNTRY

FREEDOM STATUS

Pollitical
Rights

Civil
Liberties

FREEDOM RATING

AGGREGATE SCORE

Bahrein

Not Free

7

6

6.5

12

Egypt

Not Free

6

6

6

22

Iran

Not Free

6

6

6

18

Israel

Free

2

3

2.5

78

Jordan

Parttly Free

5

5

5

37

Kuwait

Partly Free

5

5

5

36

Lebanon

Partly Free

5

4

4.5

45

Oman

Not Free

6

5

5.5

23

Qatar

Not Free

6

5

5.5

25

Saudi Arabia

Not Free

7

7

7

7

Syria

Not Free

7

7

7

0

Turkey

Not Free

5

6

5.5

31

United Arab Emirates

Not Free

7

6

6.5

17

West Bank

Not Free

7

5

6

25

Yemen

Not Free

7

6

6.5

11

Turkey

Syria

Saudi Arabia

Iraq

Iran

Oman

Yemen

Yemen

Egypt

Jordan

Emirates

Kuwaitt

Qatar

Bahrein

Lebanon

West Bank

Israel